Vulnerabilities and interconnectedness have been made visible by the COVID-19 pandemic and its consequences. At issue are the vulnerabilities of people who have been harmed by or will be harmed by the virus directly and those harmed by measures taken to slow its relentless march; vulnerabilities in our institutions, governance and legal structures; and vulnerabilities in other countries and at the global level, where persistent injustices harm us all.

These vulnerabilities are examined in this feature series, whose op-eds are derived from a major new volume called Vulnerable: The Law, Policy and Ethics of COVID-19, edited by Colleen M. Flood, Vanessa MacDonnell, Jane Philpott, Sophie Thériault and Sridhar Venkatapuram. With 43 chapters written by 69 experts, this peer-reviewed volume provides a broad look at the issues raised by the pandemic in order to centre equity in our ongoing responses. The book is available open access from University of Ottawa Press.

Support for this series was provided in part by the University of Ottawa Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics and the uOttawa Public Law Centre.

Photo: Cape Town, South Africa, in April 2020, during the COVID-19 lockdown. Shutterstock.com, bfivepointsix