Dan Gardner is a journalist, author, lecturer, and a former editor of Policy Options. He was a national affairs columnist and an investigative features writer at the Ottawa Citizen, where his work won or was nominated for every major Canadian newspaper journalism prize. Prior to becoming a journalist, Gardner was senior policy adviser to Ontario's minister of education and social policy adviser to Ontario's premier. He is the author of Risk: The Science and Politics of Fear (2008), Future Babble: Why Expert Predictions Fail and Why We Believe Them Anyway (2011), and co-author (with Philip Tetlock) of Superforecasting: The Art And Science of Prediction (2015). His books have been published in eighteen countries and sixteen languages. He holds a master's degree in modern history from York University and a law degree from Osgoode Hall Law School.

Articles by this author

A plausible hypothesis ≠ a certainty

"Germanwings Co-Pilot Intentionally Crashed Plane," reads the headline in Foreign Policy this morning. There are lots more like it in media outlets around the world. But is it true? That conclusion is based on a statement by …

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Anti-anti-norwailing

Bemoaning Alberta's failure to save oil revenues, as Norway did, has become standard fare for pundits, and critics of "norwailing" -- kudos to economist Andrew Leach for the excellent neologism ”” have emerged. They have various arguments. …

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Can we please talk about the CBC?

There is an argument to be made for ceasing to fund the CBC and putting the $930 million it receives annually to other uses. There is also an argument for increasing the CBC's funding to a level …

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Criminal folly

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court of Canada struck down a mandatory minimum sentence, in part because there's little evidence that mandatory minimum sentences deter crime. On Wednesday, in this forum, Dr. Barry Dworkin expressed his great frustration …

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Forecasting the UK election

The economist Justin Wolfers has an excellent explanation of why today's British election is so hard to forecast. The essential problem (which Canadians are quite familiar with) is that not all voters will choose the candidate and party they …

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It's not 1980. Or 1997.

Stephen Tapp's excellent post about deficits and debt -- and particularly his observation that the consensus thinking is "stuck in the 1990s" -- reminded me of something similar south of the border. Far too many Republicans …

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Mr. Gates and Mr. Harper

Bill Gates meets Stephen Harper in Ottawa today ”œto discuss opportunities for future collaboration,” says the government's press release, ”œespecially in the area of maternal, newborn and child health (MNCH).” All very worthy. But what …

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Simple Minds

We are all vulnerable to what psychologist Ziva Kunda called “motivated reasoning.” We have views. Sometimes we are strongly committed to them. And it's easier to make evidence conform to our views than the other …

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Swedish prostitution policy is no panacea

Like almost everyone who lauds Swedish prostitution policy, Globe and Mail columnist Margaret Wente ignores an obvious and critical factor in judging the effects of that policy: geographic displacement. ”œAcross the bridge from southern Sweden is …

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The Canadian Inequality Story

On September 23rd, the Vancouver School of Economics at the University of British Columbia welcomed Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz to participate in a panel discussion on Inequality in North America. Stiglitz, and fellow panelists Nicole …

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The end ― and the beginning

In the IRPP office in Montreal, behind the editor's desk, is a shelf that holds every edition of Policy Options. The collection is wider than a big man's arm span. The first magazine, its pages yellowed, …

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Two rules for the new government

Congratulations, Liberals. After wandering for 40 years in the wilderness – or what felt like 40 years – you have returned to the promised land. I’m sure you’ll make yourselves at home. But before you …

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Une fin... et un nouveau départ

Derrière le bureau du rédacteur en chef d’Options politiques à Montréal, une étagère rassemble la collection complète des numéros du magazine. En largeur, elle dépasse l’envergure des bras d’un solide gaillard. Le tout premier numéro aux …

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